NGC 5139 – Omega Centauri

NGC 5139 – Omega Centauri, the largest globular cluster of the night sky, but only visible from the southern hemisphere. Would it be a good target to test new gear?

My new gear

In July I bough a Canon T6i and a field flattener for my Long Perng S400M-C 66mm f/6 refractor . I was so excited with my new gear that I took some pictures, did a basic processing and then totally forgot to publish it.

The gear I shooted NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri: New Canon T6i and Field Flattener
The gear I shooted NGC 5139 – Omega Centauri: New Canon T6i and Field Flattener

I choose this one as my first test by two reasons. First one, I have already taken a picture of this globular cluster with my old Nikon D5000, and it would be a good comparison.

Second, this is an easy target, but this field full of stars is a good way to measure focus and focal plane correction. Besides, there are some faint galaxies around NGC 5139 that only a good exposure could solve.

The differences are huge. My Nikon D5000 have 12.3mp, and my new Canon T6i have 24mp. Twice the number of pixels. This mean that now I’m closer from the correct arcsec/pixel ratio for my telescope, but also means that my computer strugles a lot more to pre/pos process the images.

At the same time, now I can use almost all the field of view of the image, thanks to the field flattener.

The night didn’t help

I wanted to make at least 4 hours, with frames of 180 seconds. But I knew the clouds would came fast. Then I stayed with 60s frames.

My bortle 6 skies don’t wan’t to help, and my optolong L-Pro still didn’t arrived.

The results: NGC 5139 – Omega Centauri

Oh my, I love this giant!

NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri

Setup:

EXIF:

  • 88x60s
  • ISO 1600
  • DARKS: 100
  • FLAT: 50
  • BIAS: 150
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