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Constellation Crux and Coalsack Nebula (C99)

This image of the Constellation Crux and the Coalsack Nebula (C99) uses one of the first light captured with my Canon T6i, back in July, 2020, with a 135mm lens. I just totally forgot to proccess this one! Shame on me.

These are two objects really close on to each other on the southern hemisphere. And although they’re very close to each other, they’re also very different. Let’s talk about them?

The Crux constellation

The constellation Crux is one of the easyests constellations we can identify on the southern hemisphere. In a shape of a crux (You don’t say??), it is located inside the constellation Centaurus and next to constellation Carina.

The alfa of the constellation Crux is also knowed as Acrux or “The Magellanic Star”. It is very bright and easy to identify. Through a telescope, though, Acrux shows itself as a incredible double star.

On the left arm of constellation crux is located the Jewel Box, a very beautiful open cluster, visible with naked eyes but gorgeous through a telescope or a binoculars.

The Coalsack Nebula (C99)

The Coalsack Nebula, or Caldwell 99, is the biggest dark nebula of the entire sky. On a dark sky location, is visible through naked eyes, obscuring the milky way stars next to the constellation Crux.

When I say that it’s the biggest dark nebula, is because it is big. Really big. Even through my 135mm lens I can’t get it’s full extension. And it’s so big as it’s beautiful.

My first capture with the Canon T6i

When I bought my Canon T6i (Canon 750D), the skies cleared up for 1 or 2 days, and I managed to capture about 1h of the constellation Crux and Coalsack Nebula. But, for some sort of a reason, I totally forgot to proccess those lights captured.

Some time later, with clouds on the sky for months, the abstinence made me search for some light frames to process, and bang! I found 142 frames of 30 seconds with my Nikon 135mm f2.8 Ai.

After some time processing it, here is the result:

Constellation Crux and Coalsack Nebula (C99) at 135mm
Constellation Crux and Coalsack Nebula (C99) at 135mm

What are your thoughts?

EXIF

This is the equipment I used to capture this image:

No autoguiding this time!

And the lights:

  • 142x30s (Total of 1.2h of exposure);
  • ISO 1600;
  • Bortle 6 skies;
  • Moon: 81% illuminated;
  • No darks, flats or BIAS;
  • Data captured on July 9, 2020;
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Messier 42, The Orion Nebula – a new version

On November 2020 the skies allowed me to shoot Messier 42, The Orion Nebula, again. This time I used my new camera and light pollution filter, and now the result is… kinda ok.

I got only 55 minutes with 30s frames, but the surrounding nebulosity already begun to show itself.

My new field flattener also helped a lot to flatten the borders of the frame!

Messier 42 does not require any comments. It’s probably the most known nebula of the sky, visible through naked eyes!

The Orion constallation is full of this emission nebulas, but M42 is by far the most proeminent.

Enough talking! Here comes the pic:

Setup for photographing Messier 42

Canon T6i (750D) astro modified
Long Perng S400M-C 66mm f/6 refractor
Field Flattener for short refractors (Looks like Orion Field Flattener)
iOptron CEM25P with a 2″ tripod
ZWO 60280 Finder and Guide Scope
QHY5L-ii Color

EXIF:

110 x 30s
ISO 1600
150 DARKS, FLATS and BIAS

See in more detail:

Instagram
Astrobin
Flickr