post

Conjunction of the Moon and Venus

I’m a simple guy, with some rules in life. Equalizate wine and beer. Don’t be a douchebag. Go sleep late. Don’t wake up sooner than the needed. Don’t miss any astronomical ephemerid, specially a conjunction of the Moon and Venus.

On June 19 I woke up at 5h30am just to shoot the conjunction of the Moon and Venus, in a clear conflict between my precious rules. My intention was to shot this ephemerid with my Long Perng S400M-C 66mm f/6 refractor , but the moon was to low in the sky to be reached by my iOptron CEM25P equatorial mount. My setup kept resting. Then I decided to give a try to my Nikon Nikkor 135mm f2.8 Ai.

How lucky am I? A lot. There was some beautiful clouds near the moon, which gave to the picture a fine touch of colors.

Here it is:

Conjunction of the Moon and Venus on June 19
Conjunction of the Moon and Venus on June 19

Setup:

Exif:

  • ISO: 200
  • Exposure: 1s
  • F-stop: 4

The Conjunction of the Moon and Venus was a beautiful event. The moon was a little more than 2 degrees from Venus, and just to the right was the Taurus constellation.

To give a final touch of beautifulness, the earthshine on the moon was awesome, and I managed to shot it right.

I hope you liked it!

post

IC 2944 – Running Chicken Nebula with a stock DSLR

IC 2944, the running chicken nebula, is actually an open cluster with an associated emission nebula, rich in H-Alpha. This DSO is found in the constellation of Centaurus, close to NGC 3372, the Eta Carinae Nebula.

Continue reading
post

C/2020 F8 SWAN

C/2020 F8 SWAN is a comet discovered on images of the SWAN camera, aboard of the SOHO spacecraft. Although it was imaged for the first time by the SWAN camera, was Michael Matiazzo, in Australia who first noticed it.

This little guy started to gain brightness very fast, and as soon I knew about his existence, I mounted my telescope and pointed to him.

Continue reading
post

Super Moon Mosaic on May 2020

It toke more than 10 years of astrophotography so that I finally make a moon mosaic!

After a month with a lot of good nights for deep sky astrophotography (Which I’ll post here soon), the full moon came and made it unfeasible.

But my will for astrophotography stayed. What can I do?

Well, do a moon mosaic, of course!

Continue reading
post

Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372) Close-Up

So, after shoting Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372) with a wide angle lens, now it’s time to shot this target again, this time to inaugurate my new OTA with a close-up of those beautiful hydrogen clouds and giantic star clusters.

Not everyone knows, but Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372) is four times larger than the Orion Nebula (Messier 42) and even brighter. Don’t misunderstand me. Messier 42 is incredible, but Eta Carinae is special. It is so complex, with a lot of star clusters, Hydrogen Alpha regions, dark clouds… and it’s huge! And the big red giant in its center? Speechless. This red giant totally deserves an dedicated post for its own.

Continue reading
post

Eta Carinae (NGC 3372) in wide angle

Finally, on January 7, I was able to try my “new” old Nikkor 135mm f2.8 AI, that promises to be a great wide angle lens. I chose as a target Eta Carinae Nebula, or NGC 3372.

This nebula is one of the most beloved targets of the south hemisphere. It is located on the Carina constellation, and just the main nebula itself (NGC 3372) have 2 degrees of aparent size. It is huuuuuge!

Continue reading
post

NGC 3115 (The Splindle Galaxy) – My first galaxy

I was thinking in not even publish this image here. Althougth I was happy because it was a galaxy after all, my first galaxy, I was disapointed with the results. NGC 3115 is a tiny little galaxy with just 7 arc minutes of aparent diameter.

But then I though: well, the main reason to mantein this blog is to keep an historic. Maybe this image could be important to the “Luiz” of the future to see it and compare with new photos of other galaxies and compare the results.

Continue reading